Mid-season award predictions

So it’s the official midpoint of the season even though many teams are around the 50-game mark, well past the official midway point that is 41 games. But anyway, here’s a look at who might, will, and/or should win the respective NHL awards that are handed out following the season.

Hart Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- This award will probably go to Connor McDavid or Sidney Crosby but Burns is why the Sharks lead the Pacific Division and are in the running to repeat as Western Conference champions. He’s been on the ice for 36 percent of San Jose’s goals, according to puckalytics, which compares to 28 percent for McDavid and 22 percent for Crosby. His 51 points in 50 games leads the team.

Vezina Trophy: Devan Dubnyk, Minnesota- What a story this will be. The once forgotten about, cast away to the AHL only to get another chance and thrive goaltender in Dubnyk finally getting his due. He’s statistically been right up there with Carey Price among the game’s best netminder over the past few seasons and he’s been unconscious once again this season. He leads the league in save percentage (.936) and GAA (1.88), and is second in wins (27). The only thing that separates him from the goaltending Triple Crown at the moment in Sergei Bobrovsky, who has one more win than Dubnyk.

Norris Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- For all the reasons mentioned above, and then some. He’s having an historic season for a defenseman, and is making a serious push at the Art Ross Trophy as the NHL’s leading point-getter. Should Burns win the scoring title – he’s eight points off the current perch held down by McDavid – he’d be just the second blueliner in NHL history to lead the league in scoring. The other is Bobby Orr.

Selke Trophy: Ryan Kesler, Anaheim- Kesler has been Anaheim’s best player this season. He has 39 points in 51 games while his 21:48 of ice time per game is a second behind Patrick Kane for the league-high among forwards. Kesler has taken a league-high 1,119 faceoffs, his 57.6 success rate on the draw third in the league behind Patrice Bergeron and Ryan O’Reilly among players that have taken greater than 900 faceoffs. Watch out for a late surge from Bergeron, whose offensive numbers aren’t there but numbers on defense, faceoffs, and possession remain through the roof.

Calder Trophy: Auston Matthews, Toronto- In what has been the Year of the Rookie in 2016-17, Matthews stands alone in the race for the Calder. That’s how good he is, and that’s how much higher a level he’s on than everybody else. Forget rookies, Matthews has been one of the top five players in the league this season. He looks like he’s been in the NHL for 10 years. He’s tied with Alex Ovechkin for fourth in the NHL with 23 goals.

Jack Adams Award: John Tortorella, Columbus- The Blue Jackets have broken out this season, emerging as one of the league’s best teams, highlighted by a 16-game winning streak that stretched from November to January. It’s another feather in the cap for Tortorella, whose best known for going into young clubs and getting guys to realize their potential, as he did in Tampa Bay and New York.

General Manager of the Year: Peter Chiarelli, Edmonton- Chiarelli has done a fine job reconstructing the roster in Edmonton, and the Oilers are on track to erase an 11-year playoff drought as a result. Of course, it all starts with Connor McDavid, but a Chiarelli bringing in a number of players over the past two years, such as Milan Lucic, Patrick Maroon, Andrej Sekera, Mark Letestu, and Kris Russell has changed the identity of the team. While he traded an elite talent in Taylor Hall, it’s looked like the shake up the Oilers needed.

Lady Byng Trophy: Vladimir Tarasenko, St. Louis- He’s having his best season yet, with 47 points in 49 games while carrying a Blues team that isn’t as good as years past. He’s done so by staying out of the box, with just eight penalty minutes.

Masterton Trophy: Craig Anderson, Ottawa- Anderson hasn’t played since December 5th, away from the Senators to be by his wife’s side as she undergoes treatment for cancer. However, he’s nearing a return as his wife has completed treatment.

Art Ross Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- He’s a long shot but what the heck, let’s have some fun here. I’ll be rooting for the story.

Richard Trophy: Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh- Crosby has slowed off the pace when it comes to putting the puck in the net after a torrid start to the year, but nobody has really caught up.

Thoughts Are My Own: Hey, guys, there’s good Canadian teams this year

My thoughts as we get into the mind-numbing chatter of the possibility of a Montreal-Edmonton Stanley Cup final.

*So how about those Edmonton Oilers? Just keep chugging along, tossing aside the Capitals en route to a 6-1 start.

*A group is reportedly exploring options of building a 20,000-seat arena in Scottsdale, Arizona, a potential new home for the Arizona Coyotes. This would be huge for the future of the Coyotes franchise, which now appears to be there to stay after years upon years of relocation rumors. They’d be in the thick of things, closer to Phoenix, than they are currently in Glendale.

*Another stinker for the Bruins. Two nights, two losses by a score of 10-2. Chalk it up as a combination of bad defense and shaky goaltending. That combination is no way to go through life.

*Last time a team started four goalies in four consecutive games? That would be the 2010-11 New York Islanders, according to Elias.

*The more you watch Montreal, the more you realize just how good they are.

*Montreal in the first seven games over the last three seasons: 19-1-1 (6-1, 7-0, 6-0-1).

*Corey Perry passed Paul Kariya on Anaheim’s all-time points list.

*Brendan Leipsic had three more points on Wednesday for AHL Toronto, a 4-3 overtime win over Providence. The 22-year-old has 12 points in six games.

*The Albany Devils finally lost a game, denied the 6-0 start no AHL franchise in Albany has ever accomplished. The Devils fell to 5-1 with a 3-1 loss at Wilkes-Barre/Scranton.

*A pair of four-point nights for Stockton Heat forwards Daniel Pribyl (1-3–4) and Morgan Klimchuk (2-2–4), as the Heat beat San Diego, 7-5. Klimchuk is a former first round pick by the Flames.

*Nice little night for 2017 draft hopeful Nico Hischier, who had three goals and six points in Halifax’s 6-4 win over Acadie-Bathurst.

*Carolina prospect Spencer Smallman had his first career hat trick in the QMJHL on Wednesday, a 5-2 win by Saint John over Charlottetown.

*Kole Lind had a goal and three assists in Kelowna’s 6-4 win over Victoria. Both of Calvin Thurkauf’s goals were assisted by the 17-year-old.

*Still no Nolan Patrick in the Brandon lineup. He hasn’t played since Oct. 11.

Links

A profile on Maxime Comtois of QMJHL Victoriaville, who a scouting director of an NHL team said ‘reminds (him) of Rick Nash at that age.’

A look at how the OHL’s top prospects are faring after about a month of action.

The evolution of Brad Marchand into an elite hockey talent.

Kings sign Anders Lindback to a tryout contract.

Oilers sending shockwaves through the NHL as they race out to a 6-1 start.

A ‘golden era’ of Canadian NHL franchises on the horizon.

 

Three Stars of the Weekend: Max Jones Continues Stand-out Season

A 6-foot-3 and 203 pounds, Max Jones is built like a freight train. He plays like one, too.

It’s why the Anaheim Ducks made him a first-round pick in this past June’s NHL Draft, taking him with 24th overall pick.

A power forward whose size is complemented by his strength on the puck, Jones is an impact forward with a net drive and presence in the house that is paralleled by few his age. After putting up 28 goals and 52 points in 63 games last season, helping OHL London to its first Memorial Cup title in 11 years, Jones has followed it up with a blazing start to 2016-17.

With Aaron Berisha, Christian Dvorak, Mitch Marner, and Matthew Tkachuk gone to challenge the waters of pro hockey, Jones is now one of the centerpieces of what remains a strong London team, which also includes Toronto prospect and 30-goal scorer J.J. Piccinch, and Cliff Pu (second round pick by Buffalo in 2016) up front while fifth-overall pick Olli Juolevi and Montreal prospect Victor Mete lead the charge on the back end.

Playing just six of London’s 11 games this season, Jones has five goals and 15 points, his 2.5 points per game tops in the OHL.

The 18-year-old played two of the Knights three games this weekend, putting up two goals and seven points; a three-assist performance on Thursday before posting a pair of goals and two assists on Friday.

The other two stars from CHL play this weekend:

Dylan Wells, Peterborough: The Petes netminder and Edmonton prospect had a rough go of things on Thursday, allowing four of 13 shots to go in during a 6-1 loss to Sarnia, but came back and willed Peterborough to victory on Friday, stopping 49 of 51 shots as the Petes stole a 4-2 win from Sudbury, despite being outshot 51-20. Despite his inflated GAA (3.15), Wells’ .920 save percentage is tied for fourth in the OHL.

Alexandre Alain, Blainville-Boisbriand: The 19-year-old, who leads the Armada in scoring, had four goals and six points this weekend, including a 3-2-5 performance against Sherbrooke on Friday night.

AHL

Charlie Lindgren, St. John’s: The 22-year-old stopped 73 of 76 shots this weekend, including 50 of 51 in a win over Providence on Friday.

Sven Andrighetto, St. John’s: The forward, who played 44 games with Montreal last season, scored three goals and assisted on three others in three games for the IceCaps.

Gabriel Dumont, Syracuse: The AHL veteran, in his seventh season in the American League, had three goals and an assist on Friday for the Crunch, who fell to Utica, 5-4.

NCAA

Brock Boeser, North Dakota: The Canucks prospect had five goals in two games this weekend, including a hat trick in Friday’s 3-2 win over Bemidji State.

Jake Oettinger, Boston University: The 2017 draft prospect stopped all 46 shots he faced this weekend for BU, which beat Sacred Heart and Quinnipiac to the tune of a combined 10-0 margin. His .947 save percentage is fifth in the nation, one of five freshmen ranked in the top six of that category.

Mike Vecchione, Union: The senior had four goals and an assist on Saturday against Niagara, a 5-2 win for Union. He currently leads the nation in scoring with 8-5–13 totals through six games.

Women’s NCAA

Sarah Nurse, Wisconsin: The senior had four goals for the top-ranked Badgers in Sunday’s 5-2 win over North Dakota. She’s scored goals in four consecutive games.

Sarah Potomak, Minnesota: The sophomore forward had a hat trick on Friday night against Ohio State, following up the performance with another goal on Saturday.

Katie Burt, Boston College: The junior was airtight in net as the sixth-ranked Eagles secured a win and tie in the weekend doubleheader with third-ranked Quinnipiac. She stopped 39 of the 40 shots that came her way.

 

 

Canadiens Celebrate Home Opener No. 99

It’s the first big Tuesday night in the NHL, and one of the headliners will be the Montreal Canadiens opening up the Bell Centre against the Pittsburgh Penguins, the 99th opener for the Habs. It will also be the home debut for big ticket defenseman Shea Weber, acquired from Nashville over the summer.

Here’s the slate of games for Tuesday; Colorado at Washington, 7; Anaheim at New Jersey, 7; San Jose at N.Y. Islanders, 7; Pittsburgh at Montreal, 7:30; Florida at Tampa Bay, 7:30; Arizona at Ottawa, 7:30; Dallas at Nashville, 8; Los Angeles at Minnesota, 8; Philadelphia at Chicago, 8:30; Buffalo at Calgary, 9; Carolina at Edmonton, 9; St. Louis at Vancouver, 10.

Players to Watch

Colorado: Gabriel Landeskog; The Avs captain has nine points in seven games against the Captials, the second-highest output against a team that has been in the Eastern Conference the entirety of his career. He has 10 points in seven games against Ottawa.

Washington: Evgeny Kuznetsov; The Capitals pivot has yet to record a point through two games. Tuesday’s matchup against Colorado would seem like a setup for a breakout for Washington’s leading scorer last season. In two games against the Avalanche last year, he had a 1-3–4 line. Against 28 games against Western Conference opponents last season, he had 36 points.

Anaheim: Ryan Getzlaf; Has landed 17 shots but has just one goal, coming off a season in which he buried just 7.3 percent of his chances. They have to go in at some point, don’t they?

New Jersey: Kyle Palmieri; Had a 30-goal season in 2015-16, his first year in New Jersey following five seasons in Anaheim. The Ducks would gladly take him back.

San Jose: Brent Burns; He’s got six points in three games. Looks like a man on a mission.

N.Y. Islanders: Cal Clutterbuck; Three points through three games to begin the season.

Pittsburgh: Chris Kunitz; Passed Mike Bullard for 15th place on the Penguins all-time points list with his 361st career point on Monday night. Next up is Greg Malone, at 364. Within striking distance: Mark Recchi (385) and Ron Schock (404). Needs a few seasons for Mario Lemieux’s 1,723.

Montreal: Al Montoya; Carey Price still isn’t ready to return to the ice. Thankfully, Montoya has been pretty good, with 65 saves on 69 shots through two games.

Florida: Jon Marchessault; The 26-year-old is filling in nicely for the injured Jonathan Huberdeau, with two goals and four points through two games.

Tampa Bay: Alex Killorn; He has 11 points in 16 games against the Panthers, the most points against any opponent for the 27-year-old forward.

Arizona: Oliver Ekman-Larsson; Played a yeoman-like 31:46 in the Coyotes opener.

Ottawa: Erik Karlsson; Facing Ekman-Larsson, he makes up half of the showdown between go-to Swedish defensemen.

Dallas: Kari Lehtonen; Will get his first start of the season after making 12 saves on 13 shots in relief of Antti Niemi on Saturday.

Nashville: Mike Fisher; The newly-elected captain has played 19:23 while scoring two points, taking a team-high 44 faceoffs, winning 26.

Los Angeles: Tyler Toffoli; Has put eight shots on net, but just one goal to show for it.

Minnesota: Zach Parise; His next goal will be No. 300 for his career. He ranks 18th among active players.

Philadelphia: Claude Giroux; The only player left over from the Flyers 2010 Stanley Cup run who remains on the Philly varsity.

Chicago: Richard Panik; His four goals in three games are two off the pace he totaled in 30 games for the Hawks.

Buffalo: Ryan O’Reilly; Has 40 points in 55 games against the two Alberta franchises, coming off a monstrous four-point performance against Edmonton on Sunday.

Calgary: Johnny Gaudreau; No goals on nine shots, he’s snakebit.

Carolina: Sebastian Aho; The Finnish phenom has points in each of his first two NHL games.

Edmonton: Cam Talbot; The Oilers netminder has stopped just 86 of the 99 shots he’s faced.

St. Louis: Jake Allen; Needs a shutout to tie Brent Johnson for fifth on the Blues all-time shutout list. A shutout after that matches the 13-shutout output by Roman Turek, who played 121 games from 1999-2001. Lurking in the distance was Glenn Hall, whose 16 shutouts stood as a club record for 42 years until Jaroslav Halak recorded his 17th of 20 shutouts he had in a Blues uniform in October 2013. Brian Elliot, who is the franchise leader at 25, became the standard bearer in March 2015.

Vancouver: Alex Edler; The defenseman is averaging 25:20 through two games. His 24:27 ice-time per game last season was a career-high.

#HatTrickChallenge

Kyle Okposo: The big winger had a great debut on a Sunday, with a goal and assist in the Sabres 6-2 win over Edmonton. He puts up three against a Flames defense corps that looks suspect yet again.

Game of the Night

Pittsburgh at Montreal: It’s the defending Stanley Cup champions visiting the franchise with the most. You can count on the bleu, blanc et rogue reminding them of that at some point during the night. Opening night at the Bell Centre is always a spectacle.

Lock to Win

St. Louis: The Blues jump out to a 4-0 start against a Vancouver team who is out to a 2-0 start, but hasn’t faced a team as good as St. Louis and will be playing its backup goaltender.

Links

Craig Custance looks into Doug Armstrong’s penchant for scooping up first-round picks that didn’t work out for other franchises.

Shea Weber set to introduce himself to the Montreal faithful.

Zach Parise, closing in on his 300th career goal, touches upon his unique relationship with Wild assistant Scott Stevens. Parise’s early days in New Jersey (he was drafted by the Devils with the 17th pick of the 2003 draft, played there until 2012) intersected with the final days of Stevens’ years with the Devils, where he played 13 of his 22 seasons in his Hall of Fame career.

Blues forward Jaden Schwartz, originally expected to miss a month, could return earlier than initially expected. Matt Murray could be close to returning for the Penguins.

With Ryan Miller unavailable, the Canucks have called upon University of British Columbia netminder Matt Hewitt as an emergency backup for Tuesday’s game against St. Louis.

The Avalanche feed off the energy from new coach Jared Bednar and captain Gabriel Landeskog.

 

Preseason Power Rankings: Lightning the Class of the NHL

Here’s how the last two seasons have ended for the Tampa Bay Lightning; 2014-15, two wins shy of winning its first Stanley Cup since 2004; 2015-16, one win shy of becoming the first team in seven years to win back-to-back Prince of Wale Trophies.

And here’s the thing – the Bolts are only getting better.

The talk in the East has been about Washington, whether or not its the year the Capitals finally break through and put Alex Ovechkin’s name on the Stanley Cup. Of course, that’s been the dialogue for quite some time now. Then there’s also those who bring up the yearly ‘is this the year a Stanley Cup winner defends its title?’ That’s the conversation around Pittsburgh.

Meanwhile, down in the central Florida resides the best team the NHL has to offer.

The Lightning are a team built for the modern NHL. A team the plays at a pace that emulates its name, Tampa goes four lines deep of skill players who use their legs as their greatest weapons in creating pressure and forcing teams to make mistakes. The defense corps is among the elite fluent-skating blue lines, led by behemoth Victor Hedman.

Steven Stamkos leads the charge as he kicks off an eight-year pact to remain in Tampa Bay. He’s complimented by rising superstar Nikita Kucherov up front, along with Tyler Johnson, who comes in poised for a breakout campaign.

Goaltender Ben Bishop is one of the world’s premier puck stoppers, while Andrei Vasilevskiy is as good a second option you’ll find.

Health is the big x-factor going into the season, which kind of goes without saying. But when you consider injuries that have befallen key players on the club over the past couple seasons, including Stamkos, Johnson, Bishop, and Anton Stralman, it becomes a little more magnified.

Regardless, this looks like the team to beat at the early goings.

2- Washington: Some might say 1-A. The Capitals have never been built so well for the playoffs during the Ovechkin era.

3- Anaheim: The window is closing. Expect Bob Murray to deal Cam Fowler or one of his blue-chip defensive prospects to provide help up front.

4- Pittsburgh: No team has repeated since the 1997-98 Red Wings. Reports out of Pittsburgh is that the Penguins really want to be that team to do it.

5- Chicago: 30 goals and 77 points as a rookie, yet Artemi Panarin remains grossly underrated.

6- Montreal: Shea Weber and Andrew Shaw add a lot of what was missing in the Canadiens room last season.

7- Dallas: Jim Nill needs to find a goaltender. But you knew that.

8- San Jose: The young guys on the Sharks were flying under the radar this time last year.

9- Nashville: The most exciting team in the NHL. Mike Fisher caps first year as captain by posing for a picture alongside Gary Bettman.

10- St. Louis: If Jake Allen performs to expectations, this team won’t miss a beat.

11- Florida: The Cats have a rebuilt blue line that emulates its in-state rival.

12- Calgary: The Flames won’t finish 30th in defense this season.

13- N.Y. Rangers: Sleeper Stanley Cup pick.

14- Detroit: A defensively suspect team, but the Red Wings should score at a pretty reasonable clip.

15- Minnesota: Bruce Boudreau wins. I could make a cheesy Donald Trump pun, but I’m not going to.

16- N.Y. Islanders: John Tavares wins the Hart Trophy.

17- Philadelphia: Steve Mason is solid, but the goaltending is still feast-or-famine. Everybody is falling in the Michael Leighton trap with Michal Neuvirth.

18- Boston: They’ll be in the thick of the wildcard race again, but the Bruins remain a good year or two away.

19- Los Angeles: The Kings are an Anze Kopitar away from being Team USA-bad.

20- Winnipeg: Newly-christened as the Jets captain, Blake Wheeler finally gets his due among the NHL’s best.

21- Buffalo: Don’t be surprised if this team makes the playoffs.

22- Edmonton: Connor McDavid leads the league in points.

23- Arizona: Oliver Ekman-Larsson makes a push for the Norris.

24- Carolina: Justin Faulk is a finalist for the Norris.

25- Ottawa: Erik Karlsson wins the Norris (again).

26- New Jersey: Cory Schneider can only do so much.

27- Toronto: Still 2-3 years away.

28- Columbus: Potential surprise team. Blue Jackets dispel the ‘John Tortorella only plays guys who trap and block shots’ theory. Zach Werenski wins Calder Trophy.

29- Colorado: MacKinnon and Duchene the bright spots in Denver.

30- Vancouver: It was clear Alain Vigneault was the problem.

Pacific Division: Facts, Figures, Predictions

*Doug Weight is the only Oiler to post 82 points in a season since 1992. He did it three times; 104 in 1995-96, 82 in 1996-97, and 90 in 2000-01.

*A fifth consecutive playoff appearance for the Anaheim Ducks next spring would set a new franchise record.

*The Ducks were the class of the league last season on both the powerplay and penalty kill. Five-on-five wasn’t Anaheim’s strong suit, however, as its 127 even strength goals ranked 26th in the NHL.

*Among 34 goalies who have appeared in 100 games over the last four seasons, Mike Smith is tied for 27th in save percentage (.911) and 32nd in GAA (2.80).

*Drew Doughty is just the second player to average 28 minutes per game in back-to-back seasons for the Los Angeles Kings. He joins Rob Blake, who did so in 1999-00 and ’00-01.

*Joe Thornton and Henrik Sedin are second and third, respectively, behind Jaromir Jagr on the assists leaderboard among active players; Thornton with 948 and Sedin with 748. Fourth place? Jarome Iginla, at 662.

Predictions

1- Anaheim: The Ducks aren’t deep up front, but loaded on the back end. John Gibson shines in first full season.

2- Calgary: On paper, the Flames had no business being the worst defensive team in the league last year. Expect much better results with bounceback year on blue line plus addition of Brian Elliot.

3- San Jose: It’s time we begin acknowledging Joe Pavelski as one of the 10 best players in the league.

4- Edmonton: McDavid is the main attraction, but Peter Chiarelli is building something special. The Oilers will win a Stanley Cup within five years.

5- Arizona: Don’t count out the Coyotes as a surprise playoff team.

6- Los Angeles: After Team USA debacle, things don’t get better for Dean Lombardi as slow decline in LA continues.

7- Vancouver: The Canucks showed up at the Hashtag-*INSERT QUIRKY SYNONYM FOR BEING BAD*-For-*INSERT NAME OF PRESUMPTIVE FIRST OVERALL PICK* party two years too late.

What Should We Expect From Connor McDavid in Year 2?

Expect Connor McDavid to push toward 105-110 points in 2015-16, his second season in the NHL.

That, of course, been the million dollar question of the offseason. What to expect of McDavid, who was officially coronated as the first overall draft pick in the 2015 draft when the Edmonton Oilers selected him with the first pick, the pick that followed years of hype and lead-up.

McDavid had a very good rookie season, one that was derailed by a broken collarbone that sidelined him for three months. Limited to 45 games, McDavid finished with 16 goals and 48 points. While the performance wasn’t enough to take the Calder Trophy out of the hands of Chicago forward Artemi Panarin, McDavid was the only rookie to average more than a point per game, with 1.07, which equates to 88 points over an 82-game portfolio. Only Patrick Kane and Jamie Benn met that standard last season. Only five players have reached 88 points in their freshman season, ever.

It’s what puts McDavid right in the thick of the Art Ross Trophy conversation. A full blue-and-orange offseason while now having a taste of life inside NHL glass sets the standard even higher than the rookie output the teenager.

As not only conventional wisdom, but also history, suggests, a significant jump in production is expected from the 19-year-old who already has it all.

Eleven players in NHL history have career averaged of 1.2 points per game, which approximates to roughly 100 over the course of 82. McDavid is expected to be the 12th.

The 11 had average rookie outputs of 1.1, just a notch above McDavid’s 1.07. The number ranks seventh on that list of greats, behind Peter Stastny (1.415), Mario Lemieux (1.369), Wayne Gretzky (1.325), Sidney Crosby (1.259), Mike Bossy (1.246), and Kent Nilsson (1.162). It’s worth noting, of course, that all six played at least 73 games. So a sample of 25 games greater than McDavid, in the worst case.

But what happens when they get into the second season?

It varies. The average jump was somewhere from a 20-30 percent increase in production. Gretzky jumped 25.8 percent when he went from his rookie mark of 1.325 to 1.73, 110 to 123. Lemieux, who went from 112 points to 146 from his freshman to sophomore season, saw a 29.9 percent jump in point-per-game production (1.369 to 1.78). Crosby jumped 20.5 percent from 1.259 to 1.518.

There are outliers. Bobby Orr didn’t experience any jump despite winning the Norris Trophy in his second season. Limited to 46 games by an offseason knee injury, Orr had similar production to his rookie year. That said, he had a 41.9 percent increase from his second to third. Guy Lafleur actually saw his production dip nine percent, though he did that playing for a Stanley Cup-winning Montreal squad in which the likes of Jacques Lemaire, brothers Pete and Frank Mahovlich, and Yvan Cournoyer were in the prime of their careers. Phil Esposito saw his production dip, though he didn’t truly blossom until after he was traded from Chicago to Boston in 1967.

Pegging the production jump for McDavid at around 20-25 percent would put him at 105-110 points. It would be fairly uncharted waters for both the NHL, as just two players have surpassed the 105-point over the last six seasons, Evgeni Malkin (109, 2011-12), and Patrick Kane (106, 2015-16).

The Oilers haven’t had 100-point scorer since Doug Weight, in 1995-96. Nobody has broken 105 points since Mark Messier posted 129 in 1989-90.

But McDavid is a different case. A player who has a skill-set unlike any other in the NHL currently (except maybe Crosby), a player whose numbers back up the hysteria over his potential, the teen – who turns 20 in January – looks poised to put up numbers not seen in quite some time in not just Edmonton, but the NHL.