Goalies: 6-10

6 – Craig Anderson

Anderson was one of the real feel-good stories of last season, leading the Senators to overtime of Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Final after missing much of the regular season to be be his wife’s side as she battled cancer. But Anderson was no flash in the pan – he’s quietly been very good for a while now. Since arriving in Ottawa in February 2011 from Colorado for Brian Elliott in a goalie-for-goalie trade, the 36-year-old has won 151 games, posting a .920 save percentage and 2.59 GAA.

7 – Tuukka Rask

Rask had a phenomenal first half last season before falling off in the second half as he battled some injuries while having a leaky defense in front of him. The key for the Bruins is to get some relief for the goalie, who has averaged 66 games over the past three seasons. If he can get under 60 – he started 58 games when he won the Vezina Trophy in 2013-14 – that could be the difference between the Bruins missing the playoffs outright or making the playoffs and winning a round or two.

8 – Henrik Lundqvist

I’m not sure if Lundqvist’s place among goalies all-time is as high as some feel it is, but he’s high. Lundqvist needs two wins to catch Glenn Hall for ninth all-time in victories. He had one of his worst seasons last year – Lundqvist’s .910 save percentage was a career-low and snapped a seven-year streak of plus-.920 campaigns. That may have been a 34-year-old goalie, or a bad Rangers defense, or a combination of both. We’ll see how Lundqvist performs this season behind an improved back end.

9 – John Gibson

Gibson has improved steadily over the past two seasons, winning the Jennings Trophy in 2015-16 before posting a .924 save percentage and 2.22 GAA last season. The addition of Ryan Miller will only help the 24-year-old.

10 – Jake Allen

We’ll see how this one ages. All I’ve heard on Allen is how talented he is and I think he really turned a corner with his second half performance last season. I think the Blues have a legit No. 1 here going forward.

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Mid-season award predictions

So it’s the official midpoint of the season even though many teams are around the 50-game mark, well past the official midway point that is 41 games. But anyway, here’s a look at who might, will, and/or should win the respective NHL awards that are handed out following the season.

Hart Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- This award will probably go to Connor McDavid or Sidney Crosby but Burns is why the Sharks lead the Pacific Division and are in the running to repeat as Western Conference champions. He’s been on the ice for 36 percent of San Jose’s goals, according to puckalytics, which compares to 28 percent for McDavid and 22 percent for Crosby. His 51 points in 50 games leads the team.

Vezina Trophy: Devan Dubnyk, Minnesota- What a story this will be. The once forgotten about, cast away to the AHL only to get another chance and thrive goaltender in Dubnyk finally getting his due. He’s statistically been right up there with Carey Price among the game’s best netminder over the past few seasons and he’s been unconscious once again this season. He leads the league in save percentage (.936) and GAA (1.88), and is second in wins (27). The only thing that separates him from the goaltending Triple Crown at the moment in Sergei Bobrovsky, who has one more win than Dubnyk.

Norris Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- For all the reasons mentioned above, and then some. He’s having an historic season for a defenseman, and is making a serious push at the Art Ross Trophy as the NHL’s leading point-getter. Should Burns win the scoring title – he’s eight points off the current perch held down by McDavid – he’d be just the second blueliner in NHL history to lead the league in scoring. The other is Bobby Orr.

Selke Trophy: Ryan Kesler, Anaheim- Kesler has been Anaheim’s best player this season. He has 39 points in 51 games while his 21:48 of ice time per game is a second behind Patrick Kane for the league-high among forwards. Kesler has taken a league-high 1,119 faceoffs, his 57.6 success rate on the draw third in the league behind Patrice Bergeron and Ryan O’Reilly among players that have taken greater than 900 faceoffs. Watch out for a late surge from Bergeron, whose offensive numbers aren’t there but numbers on defense, faceoffs, and possession remain through the roof.

Calder Trophy: Auston Matthews, Toronto- In what has been the Year of the Rookie in 2016-17, Matthews stands alone in the race for the Calder. That’s how good he is, and that’s how much higher a level he’s on than everybody else. Forget rookies, Matthews has been one of the top five players in the league this season. He looks like he’s been in the NHL for 10 years. He’s tied with Alex Ovechkin for fourth in the NHL with 23 goals.

Jack Adams Award: John Tortorella, Columbus- The Blue Jackets have broken out this season, emerging as one of the league’s best teams, highlighted by a 16-game winning streak that stretched from November to January. It’s another feather in the cap for Tortorella, whose best known for going into young clubs and getting guys to realize their potential, as he did in Tampa Bay and New York.

General Manager of the Year: Peter Chiarelli, Edmonton- Chiarelli has done a fine job reconstructing the roster in Edmonton, and the Oilers are on track to erase an 11-year playoff drought as a result. Of course, it all starts with Connor McDavid, but a Chiarelli bringing in a number of players over the past two years, such as Milan Lucic, Patrick Maroon, Andrej Sekera, Mark Letestu, and Kris Russell has changed the identity of the team. While he traded an elite talent in Taylor Hall, it’s looked like the shake up the Oilers needed.

Lady Byng Trophy: Vladimir Tarasenko, St. Louis- He’s having his best season yet, with 47 points in 49 games while carrying a Blues team that isn’t as good as years past. He’s done so by staying out of the box, with just eight penalty minutes.

Masterton Trophy: Craig Anderson, Ottawa- Anderson hasn’t played since December 5th, away from the Senators to be by his wife’s side as she undergoes treatment for cancer. However, he’s nearing a return as his wife has completed treatment.

Art Ross Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- He’s a long shot but what the heck, let’s have some fun here. I’ll be rooting for the story.

Richard Trophy: Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh- Crosby has slowed off the pace when it comes to putting the puck in the net after a torrid start to the year, but nobody has really caught up.

Craig Anderson Leave of Absence Latest in Line of Goalies Having to Miss Time

It’s been a strange year for goalies across the NHL, with a number of varsity netminders going down with a wide array of injuries, illnesses, bouts with food poising, and so on. Aces, starters, good backups, journeyman backups, NHL-AHL tweeners up on emergency duty, have been claimed. No discrimination to report of.

The latest case came on Thursday night, when the Ottawa Senators announced that goalie Craig Anderson would be taking a leave of absence from the team in what the club deemed a ‘personal matter’. There were no specifics given as to what exactly that personal matter was, and no timetable was given for the return of the 35-year-old netminder.

It’s the latest on the long list of teams losing goalies for various reasons this season. It began with Jonathan Quick going down in the Kings opener, and is expected to be out three months with a groin injury. His replacement, Jeff Zatkoff, is currently shelved with a lower-body injury. Arizona lost Mike Smith to a lower-body injury, Anaheim lost its backup Jonathan Bernier to an upper-body injury. Boston ace Tuukka Rask is on injured reserve with an unspecified injury. He’s joined by backup Anton Khudobin. Carey Price and Robin Lehner have missed time fighting illness, and Pekka Rinne was one of several Predators removed from the lineup with a bizarre case of food poisoning.

It’s been one thing after another; one player after another. And the season is barely two weeks gone.

Anderson was coming off what was by far his best game of the season on Tuesday night, stopped all 22 shots that came his way in a 3-0 win over Vancouver. He had allowed 15 goals in his first four games with a save percentage of .886 despite Ottawa winning three of those games.

Anderson has been among the upper echelon of NHL puckstoppers since he was traded to Ottawa in February 2011 for ace-to-be Brian Elliot. Anderson has stopped pucks at a .919 rate while his GAA sits a 2.64. He needs 16 wins to match the franchise record of 146, held by Patrick Lalime.

The Senators will now call on Andrew Hammond, known best as the ‘Hamburgler’ after leading Ottawa on a late-season tear to get into the playoffs in 2014-15. He’s done little since, however, going just 7-12-4 in 25 games with .910/2.75 totals. He allowed five goals on 25 shots in his only action this season.

That said, the Senators are out to a 4-2 start in spite of its goaltending. The Sens have a .888 team save percentage in six games, one of 13 teams with a save percentage south of .900.

The Joe Louis Arena Farewell Tour Kicks Off Tonight

Nothing that really jumps out in terms of game action for Monday; the most notable likely the Red Wings beginning its 81-game home slate at the ‘Joe’ for the final time, as the club will move to a shiny new venue in downtown Detroit next fall.

Here’s the action for tonight: Colorado at Pittsburgh, 7; San Jose at N.Y. Rangers, 7; Ottawa at Detroit, 7; Boston at Winnipeg, 8.

Players to Watch

Colorado: Joe Colborne – Scored a hat trick in his first game in an Avs uniform on Saturday night, a 6-5 win over Dallas. The former first round pick, playing in fourth organization after stays in Boston, Toronto, and Calgary, looks like he’s finally finding his game. He went for a career-high 44 points last season (previous was 28), and looks to only be continuing on the upward path.

Pittsburgh: Evgeni Malkin – Has three points in two games but has struggled in the faceoff circle, winning just 14 of 42. A 43.6 percent faceoff man for his career, Malkin’s faceoff percentage has gone down every year since his career-high 48.8 percent success rate in 2013-14.

San Jose: Martin Jones – It’s been two games, but he’s out to show last season was no fluke; 2-0 record with 47 saves on 50 shots in two games.

New York: Rick Nash – He’s pointless through two games, with just five shots on goal. Just the third time in his career he’s been held to such a low output through two games. Last season was one of them; the other was in 2006.

Ottawa: Craig Anderson – Senators are 2-0, but it’s not because Anderson has stood on his head. In fact, he’s allowed seven goals on 62 shots.

Detroit: Dylan Larkin – His praises were being sung – and rightfully so – during his standout rookie season a year ago. But he’s a minus-four with just one point through two games, winning 42.9 percent of his draws.

Boston: David Backes – Injured his hand in a fight during Saturday’s 4-1 loss to Toronto. He’s expect to play.

Winnipeg: Blake Wheeler – He has four points through two games while peppering eight shots at the cage in 21:55 average of ice time. The Bruins could use a guy like him…

#HatTrickChallenge

David Pastrnak: The Bruins forward caps off National Pasta Day the right way.

Game of the Day

Ottawa at Detroit – Not the sexiest matchup but nonetheless the home opener for the Red Wings, the final one at Joe Louis Arena.

Lock to Win

Red Wings – The Wings need the win on the heels of an 0-2 start. They haven’t been terrible offensively, but the Sens are vulnerable on defense.

Links

Larry Brooks stumps for the Rangers to go get Jacob Trouba.

Jimmy Vesey has yet to register a point, but he’s already making an impact.

Major decisions loom for Senators new head coach Guy Boucher.

Sidney Crosby continues to skate.

Red Wings shuffle lines after struggling in opening two games.