Goalies: 1-5

1 – Carey Price

Price is the best goaltender on the planet. No netminder is leaned upon as heavily as the 30-year-old is in Montreal, and he’s delivered. Among goalies to appear in 180 games over the past four seasons, Price has the highest save percentage at .928. The next-highest? Cam Talbot, at .922. Price is one of four goalies to record 20 shutouts over that span, along with Braden Holtby, Tuukka Rask, and Marc-Andre Fleury. Over that span, Price has played 25 fewer games than Fleury, 51 fewer than Holtby, and 58 fewer than Rask.

2 – Braden Holtby

Is there anybody in Price’s league? A small case could be made for Holtby, who has been downright spectacular since taking over the Washington crease. In his last three seasons, the 28-year-old has won north of 40 games and finished with a save percentage above .920 in all three years, and has a 2.17 GAA over that time. He won the Vezina Trophy in 2016 and followed that up by winning the Jennings Trophy last season. We all know what trophy is missing.

3 – Devan Dubnyk

It helps having a defensive team as good as the Wild are in front of you, but Dubnyk has been great since arriving in Minnesota via a 2015 trade from Arizona. Since joining the Wild, Dubnyk has a .924 save percentage and 2.17 GAA while recording 15 shutouts. He turned in another Vezina-caliber season last year when the Wild were one of the NHL’s best teams during the regular season.

4 – Matt Murray

Is he Ken Dryden? No. Is this ranking a bit high, possibly premature? Maybe. Is Matt Murray for real? Yes (or at least I think so). Murray hasn’t played a whole lot of hockey, but has played (and played really, really well) when it’s counted, helping the Penguins win back-to-back Stanley Cups. In 32 games over the last two postseasons, Murray has a .928 save percentage and 1.95 GAA. After tearing his hamstring during warmups prior to Pittsburgh’s playoff opener last season, Murray returned during the Eastern Conference Final, recording three shutouts in 10 starts. The 23-year-old has a convincing 62-game regular season sample, going 41-12-5 with a .925 save percentage and 2.32 GAA.

5 – Sergei Bobrovsky

Bobrovsky is a little bit of a mystery. His last five seasons are bookended with lights-out, Vezina-winning campaigns while the three in between are riddled with injuries and underperformance. Is this a case of Carey Price circa 2014, a guy coming into his own as one of the game’s dominant performers? It could very well be. Time will tell.

Mid-season award predictions

So it’s the official midpoint of the season even though many teams are around the 50-game mark, well past the official midway point that is 41 games. But anyway, here’s a look at who might, will, and/or should win the respective NHL awards that are handed out following the season.

Hart Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- This award will probably go to Connor McDavid or Sidney Crosby but Burns is why the Sharks lead the Pacific Division and are in the running to repeat as Western Conference champions. He’s been on the ice for 36 percent of San Jose’s goals, according to puckalytics, which compares to 28 percent for McDavid and 22 percent for Crosby. His 51 points in 50 games leads the team.

Vezina Trophy: Devan Dubnyk, Minnesota- What a story this will be. The once forgotten about, cast away to the AHL only to get another chance and thrive goaltender in Dubnyk finally getting his due. He’s statistically been right up there with Carey Price among the game’s best netminder over the past few seasons and he’s been unconscious once again this season. He leads the league in save percentage (.936) and GAA (1.88), and is second in wins (27). The only thing that separates him from the goaltending Triple Crown at the moment in Sergei Bobrovsky, who has one more win than Dubnyk.

Norris Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- For all the reasons mentioned above, and then some. He’s having an historic season for a defenseman, and is making a serious push at the Art Ross Trophy as the NHL’s leading point-getter. Should Burns win the scoring title – he’s eight points off the current perch held down by McDavid – he’d be just the second blueliner in NHL history to lead the league in scoring. The other is Bobby Orr.

Selke Trophy: Ryan Kesler, Anaheim- Kesler has been Anaheim’s best player this season. He has 39 points in 51 games while his 21:48 of ice time per game is a second behind Patrick Kane for the league-high among forwards. Kesler has taken a league-high 1,119 faceoffs, his 57.6 success rate on the draw third in the league behind Patrice Bergeron and Ryan O’Reilly among players that have taken greater than 900 faceoffs. Watch out for a late surge from Bergeron, whose offensive numbers aren’t there but numbers on defense, faceoffs, and possession remain through the roof.

Calder Trophy: Auston Matthews, Toronto- In what has been the Year of the Rookie in 2016-17, Matthews stands alone in the race for the Calder. That’s how good he is, and that’s how much higher a level he’s on than everybody else. Forget rookies, Matthews has been one of the top five players in the league this season. He looks like he’s been in the NHL for 10 years. He’s tied with Alex Ovechkin for fourth in the NHL with 23 goals.

Jack Adams Award: John Tortorella, Columbus- The Blue Jackets have broken out this season, emerging as one of the league’s best teams, highlighted by a 16-game winning streak that stretched from November to January. It’s another feather in the cap for Tortorella, whose best known for going into young clubs and getting guys to realize their potential, as he did in Tampa Bay and New York.

General Manager of the Year: Peter Chiarelli, Edmonton- Chiarelli has done a fine job reconstructing the roster in Edmonton, and the Oilers are on track to erase an 11-year playoff drought as a result. Of course, it all starts with Connor McDavid, but a Chiarelli bringing in a number of players over the past two years, such as Milan Lucic, Patrick Maroon, Andrej Sekera, Mark Letestu, and Kris Russell has changed the identity of the team. While he traded an elite talent in Taylor Hall, it’s looked like the shake up the Oilers needed.

Lady Byng Trophy: Vladimir Tarasenko, St. Louis- He’s having his best season yet, with 47 points in 49 games while carrying a Blues team that isn’t as good as years past. He’s done so by staying out of the box, with just eight penalty minutes.

Masterton Trophy: Craig Anderson, Ottawa- Anderson hasn’t played since December 5th, away from the Senators to be by his wife’s side as she undergoes treatment for cancer. However, he’s nearing a return as his wife has completed treatment.

Art Ross Trophy: Brent Burns, San Jose- He’s a long shot but what the heck, let’s have some fun here. I’ll be rooting for the story.

Richard Trophy: Sidney Crosby, Pittsburgh- Crosby has slowed off the pace when it comes to putting the puck in the net after a torrid start to the year, but nobody has really caught up.